Assistant Professor Randall Akee is the 2016-17 recipient of the C. Doris and Toshio Hoshide Distinguished Teaching Prize in Asian American Studies

Dear Alumni and Friends,

I am very pleased to announce that Assistant Professor Randall Akee of the Department of Public Policy and American Indian Studies and a member of the AASC Faculty Advisory Committee is the 2016-17 recipient of the C. Doris and Toshio Hoshide Distinguished Teaching Prize in Asian American Studies at UCLA.

Professor Akee received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in Political Economy, M.A. from Yale University in International and Development Economics, and B.A. from Dartmouth College in Economics. He is emerging as one of the most important and influential scholars studying the socioeconomic conditions of indigenous people and formulating strategies to address their marginalization. He is a former Economic Development Specialist for the State of Hawaii, Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Since 2013, he has served on the U.S. Census Bureau's National Advisory Committee on Racial, Ethnic and Other Populations. Dr. Akee has conducted extensive research on several American Indian reservations, Canadian First Nations, and Pacific Island nations in addition to working in various Native Hawaiian communities. His main research interests are Labor Economics, Economic Development and Migration.

Colleagues and students compellingly expressed how Professor Akee was well deserving of the Hoshide Award honor. He has taught key courses that benefit Asian American Studies enormously because of how he incorporates Pacific Islanders, an understudied racial group in the United States. One colleague stated, "He epitomizes a faculty who bridges disciplinary silos -- American Indian Studies, Asian American Studies and Public Policy -- not an easy task at UCLA." In his "Economic Principles and Economic Development in Indigenous Communities" course, Dr. Akee uses Micronesian migration to Guam and the U.S. and Tongan migration to New Zealand as examples of diaspora of indigenous peoples. The significant international movement of Pacific Islanders makes this group unique among indigenous populations, creating challenges to how students understand the indigenous experience. It is the only course offered at UCLA focusing on the prosperity of Indigenous nations and communities globally through economic subsistence. "I learned first-hand of the high expectations he has for his students. Dr. Akee challenges his students intellectually. As one of a few Pacific Islander students, it made me think about what it meant to be a Pacific Islander scholar," said one student. Another student noted, "With the purpose of using data to show how Native people have successfully approached economic development, Dr. Akee effectively engaged our class in a way that felt both very thorough and intimate."

Dr. Akee's "Pacific Island Economic Development" course focuses on the Anglophone former colonies and countries in the Pacific. The class examines the economic and political development of the Hawaiian Islands, Fiji, the Islands of Micronesia, Samoa and Tahiti. A student commented, "I enjoyed every minute of Dr. Akee's class because it challenged me to look beyond the scope of my field and bridge western-indigenous methodologies to critique economically sustainable programs in the South Pacific." Dr. Akee also worked with Pacific Islander graduate students to establish the Graduate Student Association for Pasifika. It was created to support graduate students from Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander descent or areas. As one student expressed, "Dr. Akee is a role model, but a mentor to countless Pacific Islander students. He offers unencumbered and relentless support to any student seeking his guidance, which, I believe, reflects his love for teaching, research, but more so his community."

The late C. Doris Hoshide, Class of 1934, of Rockville, MD established the teaching prize to annually recognize an outstanding professor in Asian American Studies. She was a longtime supporter of Asian American Studies at her alma mater. The Hoshide Prize includes a one thousand dollar award.

Please join us in congratulating Professor Randall Akee!

Best wishes,
Marjorie Kagawa Singer, Interim Director and Melany De La Cruz-Viesca, Assistant Director

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