events
Asian American Studies Center Events


Upcoming Events
Saturday, October 11, 2020 | 1:00-3:00pm
 

Rockin' the Boat chronicles the Asian American Movement that occurred in major cities across the country, with the main focus on the Los Angeles-area.


A 288-page book with over 400 photographs by Mary Uyematsu Kao from 1969-1974




Saturday, October 3, 2020 | 1:00 pm
 

Reflections on the work and impact of poet and activist Al Robles


Celebrating Filipino American History Month and the recent expanded edition of his classic poetry collection

Rappin' With Ten Thousand Carabaos in the Dark




Friday, October 2, 2020 | 3:30 - 5:00 pm
 

Reflections on the work and impact of poet and activist Al Robles


Join us for a special program that will feature reflections on the work and impact of poet, historian, and social justice activist Al Robles, in celebration of Filipino American History Month and the recent expanded edition of his classic poetry collection 'Rappin' With Ten Thousand Carabaos in the Dark' (UCLA AASC Press).


Featured poets include:

Shirley Ancheta

Russell Leong

Oscar Peñaranda

Tony Robles

Janice Lobo Sapigao

Irene Soriano Saxon


With event emcee, Professor Lucy Mae San Pablo Burns


As part of this event series, UCLA AASC is also presenting a poetry writing workshop with writer and housing justice advocate, Tony Robles, nephew of Al Robles, on Saturday, October 3rd. Workshop info is forthcoming.


Copies of the expanded edition of 'Rappin' With Ten Thousand Carabaos in the Dark' are currently available for sale via the UCLA AASC Press Online Store.


The event is organized by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.


Co-sponsors include:

Pilipino Studies Minor, UCLA Asian American Studies Department, Digital Sala, Tres Marix


RSVP: http://ourpoetry.eventbrite.com



Thursday, October 1, 2020
 

In collaboration with Cornell University, UCLA, Barnard College (Columbia University), University of Toronto, Rutgers University, and Los Angeles' Visual Communications (VC), you are invited to an international screening of A Thousand Cuts by Ramona Diaz, followed a panel featuring Maria Ressa (Rappler), Jinee Lokaneeta (Drew University), and Gina Dent (UCSC). This panel will be moderated by Neferti Tadiar (Barnard College).


Film Screening Date: Thursday, October 1, 2020 (Film available for streaming in US and Canada)


Film Screening Location: Film viewing instructions will be sent after you.


Film Description: With press freedom under threat in the Philippines, A Thousand Cuts goes inside the escalating war between the government and the press. The documentary follows Maria Ressa, a renowned journalist who has become a top target of President Rodrigo Duterte's crackdown on the news media. Produced, written, and directed by Ramona S. Diaz (IMELDA, MOTHERLAND).


Film Registration Information: Register for the Screening by Wednesday, September 30, 2020, 8pm EDT.


Film Registration Link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-thousand-cuts-media-freedom-and-authoritarian-brutality-registration-120320332353




Panel Discussion Date and Time: October 1, 8pm EDT (8am+1 Philippines)


Panel Description: Following the screening of A Thousand Cuts, please join us for a panel featuring Maria Ressa (Rappler), Jinee Lokaneeta (Drew University), Gina Dent (UCSC), moderated by Neferti Tadiar (Barnard College). The film focuses on the current effects of Rodrigo Duterte's infamous "war on drugs" and the shutting down of independent news outlets as well as the arrest, detention, threats and humiliation of journalists, including Maria Ressa. This post-screening panel focuses on policing, state violence, and how the media and ideological landscapes enable populism and authoritarianism across the Philippines, U.S. and India. The discussion also serves as the staging ground for transnational forms of creativity, solidarity, and resistance.


Panel Registration Info: https://cornell.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN__uiiWtuvRUmcoAr1CzHziQ




Thursday, August 27, 2020 | 12:00 - 1:00 pm
 

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this seminar will be held exclusively online via Zoom.


The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed and exacerbated disparities in access to health care and other resources, and most strikingly across the diverse racial and ethnic groups across the U.S. It has not only devastated communities, it has illuminated the inequities in our health care system.


For Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPIs)—who are seeing rates of infection up to five times that of white people here in L.A. County—a lack of disaggregated race and ethnicity data has made them invisible. So how does a group which has often been masked by a lack of meaningful data become unhidden? The brand-new Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (NHPI) COVID-19 Data Policy Lab at the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research (CHPR) is looking to change that—by revealing targeted data for NHPIs across the nation in order to better deploy resources and other actions to help the disproportionately affected population.


This vibrant, diverse, and close-knit community experiences extremely high rates of chronic diseases including diabetes, certain cancers, and heart disease, obesity, and asthma, and coupled with fewer financial resources, large multi-generational households, densely populated neighborhoods, and nearly 25% working in essential jobs, places them at significantly higher risk for COVID-19.


The NHPI COVID-19 Data Policy Lab will address striking gaps within data and research for NHPIs including the need to increase the number of states reporting disaggregated NHPI COVID-19 cases—which only 30% of states are doing—and calling attention to NHPIs experiencing the highest COVID-19 rates of any racial and ethnic group here in California and throughout the country including Arkansas, Washington, Hawaii, Oregon, and Utah. Presenters will debut a dashboard that highlights the disproportionate impact COVID-19 has had on this community.


Enlisting the help of passionate students and recent graduates from across the country, UCLA CHPR Director Ninez Ponce is honored to introduce the NHPI COVID-19 Data Policy Lab at UCLA CHPR, with scholars Richard Calvin Chang, Corina Penaia, Karla Thomas, Vananh Tran, John Greer, and Nicholas Pierson.


Data produced by Ponce and the team have been used in testimony before the U.S. House of Representatives Ways and Means Committee, featured in news media, and will be included in the Health Affairs blog.


This webinar is co-sponsored by the National Pacific Islander COVID-19 Response Team, the Southern California Pacific Islander COVID-19 Response Team, and the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.


Register today!



Wednesday, August 12, 2020 | 1:00 - 2:00 pm
 

Join us for an in-depth look into our newest publications!


Mountain Movers: Student Activism & The Emergence of Asian American Studies with Karen Umemoto, Russell Jeung, Harvey Dong, Lisa Tsuchitani and Arnold Pan


Rockin' the Boat: Flashbacks of the 1970s Asian Movement with Mary Uyematsu Kao


Mixed Race Student Politics: A Rising “Third Wave” Movement at UCLA with Robert Chao Romero and James Ong



Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | 1:00 - 2:00 pm
 

Learn about the newest Amerasia Journal at our issue launch! We will feature senior editor Judy Wu (UC Irvine), guest editors Monisha Das Gupta (University of Hawai'i at Mānoa) and Lynn Fujiwara (University of Oregon), as well as some of our contributors. You can check out the abstracts from the issue, as well as read the editors' introduction at https://bit.ly/amerj461.



Thursday, July 30, 2020 | 2:00 pm
 

During this family-friendly workshop, you'll explore Virtual Manzanar and the Suitcase Activity in Minecraft, watch the short film "Boy Scouts of Heart Mountain" and meet Bill Shishima, who was a boy scout at Heart Mountain!


Led by a team from UCLA, Building History 3.0 Project is a collection of free and ready-to-use activities, games, and lesson plans for learning at home and in school. Designed to teach kids about the World War II Japanese American incarceration camps, the project offers short documentaries, worksheets, game-based learning activities in Minecraft, and more!


Please register for free at www.buildinghistoryproject.com/events

Facebook event at https://www.facebook.com/events/359369978379469



Monday, July 27, 2020 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
 

With the eviction moratorium set to be lifted on September 30, 2020,about 365,000 renter households in Los Angeles County are in imminent danger of eviction and homelessness according to a recent study from the UCLA Luskin Institute on Inequality and Democracy. Please join us for a virtual public forum with housing justice researchers and community organizers to discuss the tenants' rights crisis and what can be done to mitigate the damage to Angelenos through enforceable rights and robust protections.

The event will feature research findings from the following reports.


Speakers:
Gary Blasi, UCLA Law School
Ananya Roy, UCLA Luskin Institute on Inequality & Democracy
Paul Ong, UCLA Center for Neighborhood Knowledge
Jane Nguyen, Ktown for All
Leonardo Vilchis & Elizabeth Blaney, Union de Vecinos
Jason Li & Tenant Organizer, Chinatown Community for Equitable Development

Moderator: Karen Umemoto, UCLA Asian American Studies Center


Download the Flyer here

RSVP: https://rentmoratorium.eventbrite.com



Friday, July 24, 2020 | 2:00 pm
 

During this family-friendly workshop, you'll explore Virtual Manzanar and the Suitcase Activity in Minecraft and meet Marie Tajima from our short film "Marie's Dolls." As a young girl, Marie was forced to give up her precious Japanese doll collection before going to Heart Mountain. Hear her story and find out how she reunites with her dolls 80 years later!


Led by a team from UCLA, Building History 3.0 Project is a collection of free and ready-to-use activities, games, and lesson plans for learning at home and in school. Designed to teach kids about the World War II Japanese American incarceration camps, the project offers short documentaries, worksheets, game-based learning activities in Minecraft, and more!


Please register for free at www.buildinghistoryproject.com/events

Facebook event at https://www.facebook.com/events/586183588622690



Thursday, June 4, 2020 | 3:30 pm
 

Presented by UCLA Asian American Studies 176: the Philippines and its Elsewheres


In celebration of Cornell University's Southeast Asian Studies 70th Year and UCLA's new minor in Pilipino Studies, we invite you to join in the live streaming event of the play adaptation of Carlos Bulosan's short story "The Romance of Magno Rubio," produced by New York's Theater Ma-Yi. Streaming will be followed with Q&A and discussion with Dr. Joi Barrios, Filipino Studies lecturer and award-winning writer, UC Berkeley; actors Jojo Gonzalez, and Ron Domingo. This event honors Dr. Dawn Mabalon who continues to inspire us.


Set in Central Valley, California in the 1930s, the play focuses on Magno Rubio, an illiterate Filipino farmworker and his pen-pal courtship with Clarabelle, a white woman from Arkansas who advertises in the back pages of a "lonely hearts" magazine. Believing he's found the woman of his dreams, Magno fantasizes about their life together, only to soon realize that reality and dreams do not always align.


This recording theatrical production of one of Carlos Bulosan's short stories has been made available by Theater Ma-Yi, a three-decades-old award-winning Asian American Theater company.


Organized by Professors Christine Balance (Cornell U) and Lucy Burns (UCLA); Sponsored by Cornell SEA, UCLA Asian American Studies Dept, UCLA Asian American Studies Center, UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Cornell U Asian American Studies. Co-sponsors Pin@y Educational Partnerships (PEP), Bulosan Center for Filpino Studies, Bridge + Delta Publishing, UCLA's Vietnamese Student Association.


Register for the webinar:

https://cornell.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcucOurqTgvG9VphpcWUdjRtdlIS6ShbUgo



Monday, June 1, 2020 | 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
 

Join the UCLA Asian American Studies Center and UCLA School of Nursing to talk about stories from the front lines of COVID-19 and standing against COVID-19 & Anti-Asian racism.


Moderators:

Deborah Koniak-Griffin, Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion, UCLA School of Nursing

Karen Umemoto, Professor & Director UCLA Asian American Studies Center


Speakers:

Emma Cuenca, Assistant Adjunct Professor, UCLA School of Nursing - "Filipino/a/x and Asian Health Care Professionals on the Front Lines"


Shi Zhang, MD, Internal Medicine, Hospitalist, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center & UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica - "Risks and Sacrifices of Health Professionals"


Gilbert Gee, Ph.D. , Professor, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health - "Disease and Anti-Asian Racism: How the Past Informs the Present"


Manjusha Kulkarni, JD, Executive Director, Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council (A3PCON), Co-Founder, STOP AAPI HATE Reporting Center - "What You Can Do to Fight the Hate and Show the Love"


Organized by UCLA School of Nursing & UCLA Asian American Studies Center

Co-Sponsored by: UCLA Public Health, Asian Pacific Policy & Planning Council (A3PCON), UCLA Asia Pacific Center, UCLA International Institute, UCLA Institute of American Cultures, UCLA Alumni - Diversity Programs & Initiatives, Asian Pacific Alumni of UCLA, Pilipino American Alumni, Asian Pacific Coalition, Pacific Ties Newsmagazine, Pilipino American Graduate Student Association


RSVP: uclahs.fyi/whythehate